BRIEF2The wait is over! The gold-standard rating scale you’ve come to trust for executive function assessment is now even better. Developed by practicing pediatric neuropsychologists, the BRIEF2 continues to be as efficient, comprehensive, and consistent with current models of executive function as its predecessor but with enhanced features.
  • Parallel structure. Parent, Teacher, and Self-Report forms are now in one manual. Items are now more parallel across forms.
  • Concise scales. New scale structure reduces the burden on the parent, teacher, or adolescent respondent.
  • Increased sensitivity. Quickly identify executive function problems in key clinical groups such as ADHD and autism spectrum disorder.
  • New screening forms. In 5 minutes, determine whether a full executive function assessment is needed.
  • Updated norms. Normative data were drawn from a large, diverse, nationally stratified sample of individuals from all 50 U.S. states.
The BRIEF2 is available now! Order today: A Comprehensive Parent/Teacher/Self-Report Hand-Scored kit is just $330 or a Parent/Teacher Hand-Scored kit is just $250! The BRIEF2 is available for administration, scoring, and interpretation on PARiConnect.
If so, were you aware that you may apply for research support? All applications for research support require administrative review of the research project. To see if your project meets the criteria and to go through the evaluation process, e-mail Customer Support.
Many tests and materials sold by PAR are available only to those professionals who are appropriately trained to administer, score, and interpret psychological tests. Eligibility to purchase restricted materials is determined on the basis of training, education, and experience. Here's a quick tutorial on our qualification levels and what you need to do to make sure your credentials are up-to-date. Qualification Level: A No special qualifications are required, although the range of products eligible for purchase is limited. Qualification Level: B A degree from an accredited 4-year college or university in psychology, counseling, speech-language pathology, or a closely related field plus satisfactory completion of coursework in test interpretation, psychometrics and measurement theory, educational statistics, or a closely related area; or license or certification from an agency that requires appropriate training and experience in the ethical and competent use of psychological tests. Certain healthcare providers may be eligible to purchase selected B and C level instruments within their area of expertise. Qualification Level: C All qualifications for Level B plus an advanced professional degree that provides appropriate training in the administration and interpretation of psychological tests, or license or certification from an agency that requires appropriate training and experience in the ethical and competent use of psychological tests. Certain healthcare providers may be eligible to purchase selected B and C level instruments within their area of expertise. Qualification Level: S A degree, certificate, or license to practice in a healthcare profession or occupation, including (but not limited to) the following: medicine, neurology, nursing, occupational therapy and other allied healthcare professions, physician's assistants, psychiatry, social work; plus appropriate training and experience in the ethical administration, scoring, and interpretation of clinical behavioral assessment instruments. Any PAR Customer already qualified to purchase a B or C level product is also qualified to purchase an S level product. To establish your Qualification Level, you can either download a PAR Customer Qualification Form (you will need Adobe Acrobat to view and print the form for submission to PAR), or you can complete the Registration and Qualification process online (see Registration Help for details).  
Are you attending the National Academy of Neuropsychology Annual Conference? Make sure to stop by the PAR booth (104, 106, and 108) to check out some of our new and upcoming releases. We will have copies of the new Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales™, Second Edition (RIAS™-2), the Child and Adolescent Memory Profile™ (ChAMP™), and more on hand. Plus, preview and preorder your copy of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function®, Second Edition (BRIEF®2)! Don’t miss a presentation by Brian L. Brooks, PhD, co-author of the ChAMP and the upcoming Memory Validity Profile™ (MVP), who will be presenting a CE workshop, Advanced Pediatric Assessment, Thursday, November 5 at 1 p.m. Remember, all orders placed at the PAR booth during NAN, including preorders, will receive 15% off as well as free ground shipping and handling!
Interested in learning more about the Personality Assessment Inventory™ (PAI®)? A 45-minute training course on the PAI is now available through the PAR Training Portal. This free, interactive course will give you a quick overview of the product, explain what makes it unique, and provide insight into how it was developed. You will learn a bit about each of the PAI’s 22 nonoverlapping scales and how to interpret the assessment as a whole. And, best of all, the Training Portal is always available, so you can learn more on your schedule. The PAI has been recognized as one of the most important innovations in the field of clinical assessment. An objective inventory of adult personality, the PAI assesses psychopathological syndromes and provides information relevant for clinical diagnosis, treatment planning, and screening for psychopathology. To access the Training Portal, use your parinc.com username and password to log in. Don’t have a free account? Register now. Training courses are also available on the Vocabulary Assessment Scales™ (VAS™), the Test of General Reasoning Ability™ (TOGRA™), the Reynolds Adaptable Intelligence Test™ (RAIT™), the Academic Achievement Battery™ (AAB™), the Child and Adolescent Memory Profile™ (ChAMP™), and the Feifer Assessment of Reading™ (FAR™).
RIAS2We are pleased to announce the release of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales™, Second Edition (RIAS™-2) by Cecil R. Reynolds, PhD, and Randy W. Kamphaus, PhD. The RIAS-2 retains all the features that made the original instrument so popular and gives practitioners even more reason to trust this instrument. The revised assessment, which was developed by the original authors using feedback from clinicians around the country, remains true to the original test. It’s still fast, cost effective, and simple to administer and can be used across the developmental continuum to assess intelligence and its major components from ages 3 to 94 years.  The RIAS-2:
  • Assesses both verbal and nonverbal intelligence. Verbal intelligence is assessed by measuring verbal problem solving and verbal reasoning, which uses acquired knowledge and skills. Nonverbal intelligence is assessed by measuring reasoning and spatial ability using novel situations and stimuli.
  • Optional memory subtests available. Verbal and nonverbal memory is assessed via the Composite Memory Index, useful when a broad estimate of memory is desired.
  • Yields a General Reasoning Index (GRI). A highly reliable score, the GRI reflects overall measurement of the general factor of reasoning and problem-solving skill.
  • Informs decisions in classification, selection, and educational placement. The RIAS-2 is ideal as a stand-alone intellectual assessment or as part of a clinical battery, when a standardized assessment of intellectual functioning is needed to diagnose specific disorders such as intellectual disabilities or learning disabilities, and for educational placement.
New in the RIAS-2
  • New speeded processing subtests and index. Two supplemental subtests (one verbal, one nonverbal) combine to create the Speeded Processing Index (SPI). Both the Speeded Naming Task and Speeded Picture Search subtests require far less motor skill than competitive measures.
  • Greater data for interpretation. Reliable change scores and ability–achievement discrepancies with the AAB are provided.
  • Revised basal/ceiling rules. Now all basal and ceiling rules for the subtests are consistent with one another and allow for more accurate assessment at the lowest and highest ability level.
  • Revised/new item content. Items throughout the test have been updated to eliminate confusing or outdated content. Guess What, Odd-Item Out, Verbal Reasoning, What’s Missing, Verbal Memory, and Nonverbal Memory subtests appear in this update, retaining the structure and familiarity of the original measure.
  • Wider range of T scores. For most grade levels, T score ranges of at least 25 to 75 are available.
Technical product information and more details on what is new with this revision are available on our Web site.
PAR is proud of what we publish and we think you will be thrilled with all of our products. We never want you to be disappointed in anything you purchase. Therefore, we offer a no-risk guarantee on all of our print products. To receive a full refund, including the cost of ground/regular shipping and handling charges, return the merchandise in resalable condition with a copy of your invoice. After 45 days, shipping and handling charges cannot be refunded. Software returns must be made within 90 days. For more specific questions on returns, contact Customer Support.
This interview is a part of an ongoing feature on the PAR blog to better acquaint Customers with PAR staff. We hope you enjoy this inside look into what goes on behind the scenes to develop, create, and deliver your most trusted assessments. Sue Trujillo, Manager of Data Collection How many years have you worked at PAR? 9 1/2 years What does an average day at PAR look like to you? Read and respond to emails from data collectors, check the demographic database on projects in progress, recruit new and existing examiners to work on finding participants to fill the needed demographics, check incoming data for accuracy and log cases into my SPSS “cases needed” file, and, most recently, helping to work on new project ideas. What is the best part of your job? Talking with psychologists all over the country. When people ask you what you do, how do you explain your job? I have a database of examiners from all over the country who administer new or existing assessments in order to create the standardization norms. When you aren’t at work, where can you be found? In my yard, tending to my flowers and plants, or dancing at a rock concert. When I first started working at PAR… there wasn’t any one person who did my job. The project directors were responsible for finding authors who already had data or the project directors managed data collection themselves. If I could switch jobs with anyone in the company for a day, I’d like to try… Being a Clinical Assessment Consultant! I’d like to sell what I’ve helped create!
The story of autism spectrum disorder has always been told largely through statistics. Professionals speak of the costs to families of autistic children, the earliest age for diagnoses, and the percentage of children who develop the disorder. Many people have heard the term autism but don’t really know what it means because the statistics can’t fully convey what it means to be autistic. Autism spectrum disorder is difficult to explain and grasp because it’s a very wide spectrum. According to psychologist Kathleen Platzman, “We need an educational model wide enough to take in the whole spectrum. That means it’s going to have to be a fairly broad model.” The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) proposes three levels of severity for autism spectrum disorder, which is meant to describe its impact on everyday functioning. Individuals who require “very substantial support” are rated level 3; those who require “substantial support” are rated level 2; and those who require “support” are rated level 1. While these ratings provide important information, they don’t do a lot to help visualize the complexities of the disorder. Michael McWatters is a designer and UX Architect at TED, the organization responsible for TED Talks and various other initiatives. He’s also the father of a boy with autism spectrum disorder. When his son was diagnosed, McWatters wanted to know where he fell on the spectrum, but quickly became frustrated by the lack of an accurate visual representation of the disorder. He had envisioned the spectrum as a straight line that looks something like this: Autism image Was his son’s condition mild, severe, or somewhere in between? It seemed overly simplistic. But then McWatters had a revelation—the spectrum isn’t a single line or flat continuum at all! So he decided to create his own diagram, basing his visualization on the three generally accepted axes for the disorder: social, communication, and behavioral. autism-disorder1 (1) In his visualization, the greater the impairment on any of the three axes, the further the point moves away from the center. This visualization of the symptoms acknowledges the dimensionality of the disorder in a way a simple spectrum line cannot. We had the opportunity to speak with McWatters. He indicated that this is just the beginning of his efforts and that he views this as an experimental project. He is currently working with two leading autism researchers to revise his visualization to align more closely with DSM-5 and hopes to find a way to demonstrate both the strengths and deficits associated with autism. For Michael McWatters, autism spectrum disorder can’t be reduced to statistics and percentages—it’s deeply personal. “People have responded very positively to this visualization,” he says, “and I think it’s because it not only provides a more accurate view of autism, it demonstrates just how unique each person on the spectrum is.” You can learn more about Michael and his son on his Web site, ASDDad. We’re looking forward to his new discoveries and the graphic representation that he will create as a result. What do you think? PAR wants to hear from you, so leave your comments below.
PAR is proud of our ongoing relationship with United Way. Last week, we took part in our annual fundraising campaign. For more than 20 years, 100% of staff members have contributed during our annual United Way drive. This year was no different. We exceeded our fundraising goal, resulting in employee contributions of $81,661.72 being donated to United Way to help continue its mission of helping others in our community. [caption id="attachment_2303" align="alignleft" width="291"]Meet Opie, the newest recruit to the PAR family. Meet Opie, the newest recruit to the PAR family.[/caption] This year, our United Way week theme was PAR Boot Camp. Staffers were broken into five teams, each representing a different branch of the military, and took part in a host of activities, ranging from puzzle building to a mental tug-of-war. Ten staff members even went head-to-head in a push up contest! Our friends from the Humane Society of Tampa Bay stopped by… and one lucky pup found his forever home. Want to learn more about how you can help United Way in your community? Visit www.unitedway.org.