Tag Archives: processing speed

A current test of complex processing speed:
Introducing the RIT

The latest test from popular author Cecil R. Reynolds, PhD, the new Reynolds Interference Task (RIT) is a test of complex processing speed that assesses general neuropsychological integrity.  It is suitable for measuring the effects of traumatic brain injury, stroke, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and brain tumors. It is also useful as a measure of attention and complex processing speed deficits and as a rapid means of measuring recovery from concussion.

Measurement of speeded processing is popular in psychological testing, and most measures are exceedingly simple. Measuring how quickly one can perform simple tasks that, given unlimited time, almost everyone would complete perfectly is a reflection of speeded processing. The RIT adds a layer of cognitive processing difficulty—inhibition and attention-shifting—to simple tasks, which slows performance and requires extra mental effort, making the tasks more complex and thus more indicative of cognitive flexibility and selective attention.

The RIT features two timed Stroop-style subtests, Object Interference and Color Interference, which combine to provide a Total Score. This provides greater coverage, enhanced consistency, and more reliability than similar measures featuring a single subtest. It was designed to provide continuity of measurement across a wide age range, so it is appropriate for individuals ages 6 to 94 years. The subtests require minimal motor demand and can be administered in just 90 seconds.

Like intelligence and memory assessments, mental speeded processing (or decision speed) can be a crucial contributor to the diagnostic process for a variety of disorders, particularly those associated with compromised neuropsychological integrity.

Conormed with the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales, Second Edition (RIAS-2), the RIT includes a large standardization sample (N = 1,824) representative of the 2012 U.S. Census and includes reliable change and discrepancy scores. It’s the best of all possible psychometric worlds.

For more information, visit www.parinc.com or call 1.800.331.8378.

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