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PCSI-2 in practice!
May 25, 2021

New research presented in an upcoming article in the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology supports the use of multiple variables to  assist emergency departments’ ability to predict pediatric patients at risk for persistent postconcussive symptoms (PPCS).

The study, which cites the PostConcussion Symptom Inventory™–2 (PCSI-2), followed a cohort of 5- to 18-year-olds diagnosed with an acute concussion. Each participant’s risk factors were determined at diagnosis and they were followed for 30 days postinjury. The study found that headache and total clinical risk score were associated with greater odds of PPCS. Furthermore, teenagers, individuals with a history of prolonged recovery from a previous concussion, and those in the high-risk group (based on the Zemek et al. [2016] risk score) tended to have an increased risk of PPCS.

PAR Project Director Maegan Sady, PhD, ABPP-CN, was a coauthor of this study, which was conducted by emergency room physician Dr. Jeremy Root at Children’s National Hospital.

Learn more about the PCSI-2!