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The newest member of the Feifer Family is now available!

The Feifer Assessment of Writing (FAW) is a diagnostic achievement test designed to examine the underlying cognitive, motoric, and linguistic processes that support proficient written language skills. It is the third and final member of the Feifer family of diagnostic achievement test batteries, joining the Feifer Assessment of Reading (FAR) and the Feifer Assessment of Mathematics (FAM).

Results of the FAW help specify, from a neuropsychological perspective, exactly why a student struggles with written language so clinicians can develop appropriate, customized interventions. It also provides additional information about a student’s writing skills that allow users to dig deeper into a student’s abilities. Unlike other writing tests, the FAW provides an Administration and Scoring Guide that helps to clarify the qualitative aspects of assessing writing and serves as a go-to resource throughout scoring.

The FAW can be administered to individuals from prekindergarten through college. Depending on a student’s grade level, administration can take between 20 and 65 minutes. A screening version is also available for individuals in kindergarten through college, which can be administered in 15-20 minutes. Scoring will be available later this year via PARiConnect.

Learn more or order today!

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     We know how important it is to keep your clients, students, and patients safe during these uncertain times. Our two new white papers describe in detail how to administer the IGT2 and the WCST to your clients while staying apart, using the product software and a videoconferencing platform. Available to you completely free, these guidelines allow you to comply with social distancing requirements while continuing to serve those in need.

The IGT2 is a computerized assessment that assists in the evaluation of decision making, while the WCST is used primarily to assess perseveration and abstract thinking. The remote administration guidelines can also be used with the WCST-64These white papers continue our series of resources to help you serve your clients while you’re apart. Our recently released white paper on the RAIT and TOGRA offers similar instructions to help you evaluate intelligence via PARiConnect and a videoconferencing platform.  

  

  

  

  

  

 

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We have created PARcares as a resource to offer a hand up to those most in need. With shareable videos, blogs, and lists of free resources, PARcares is our way to show how much we care not only for our Customers, but for those you serve.

If you think someone would benefit from these resources, feel free to share them directly or through your social media channels. We will be updating regularly with new and helpful content to be used and shared with everyone.

We are all in this together.

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From FAR and FAM author Steven Feifer, DEd, comes the Feifer Assessment of Writing (FAW), a comprehensive test of written expression that examines cognitive, motoric, and linguistic processes to help explain why students may struggle with writing.

Students spend nearly 60% of their school day engaged in the process of written expression. The FAW examines the underlying processes that support proficient written language skills.

The FAW:

  • Helps specify why a student struggles with writing.
  • Provides qualitative information about a student’s writing skills.
  • Includes an Administration and Scoring Guide with instructions, tips, and examples.
  • Offers a screening version that can be completed in 20 minutes or less.

Learn more or preorder today!

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We’ve heard the requests. And we listened! The PAI Plus is coming this fall!

The PAI Plus takes the existing PAI items and gives users an updated way to interpret the data. Using the PAI, an objective inventory of adult personality, the new PARiConnect report offers:
• DSM-5® update: Updated diagnostic possibilities align with the DSM criteria.
• Alternative Model Profile: An optional new profile scores in accordance with the Alternative Model for Personality Disorders.
• Additional supplemental indices: Based on years of academic research, 15 new supplemental indices provide additional profile information related to negative and positive distortion and random responding. Supplemental clinical indicators provide profile information related to suicidality, aggression, level of care, presence of ADHD, and more.
• Context-specific norm groups: Including profile overlays for bariatric surgery candidates, child custody evaluations, chronic pain patients, college students, deployed military, egg donors/gestational carriers, motor vehicle accident claimants, police applicants, and potential kidney donors. This profile is overlayed onto the examinee’s profile to allow for comparison.
• Updated report: An updated look and feel create a streamlined and modern-looking report.

A manual supplement details the research, theory, and development behind this update.

To determine the right kit for your needs or to preorder, call Customer Support at 1.800.331.8378.

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Do you see students or clients with symptoms like restlessness, excessive talking, or difficulty staying on task? Sometimes, it can be difficult to know if the behaviors are age-appropriate and typical or if they might be signs of ADHD–the primary developmental disorder of executive function.

Find out quickly with the new BRIEF2 ADHD Form.

Using results from the BRIEF2, the gold-standard instrument for assessing executive function, the BRIEF2 ADHD Form takes a three-step approach to predict the likelihood of an ADHD diagnosis. This knowledge helps parents, clinicians, and educators get children and adolescents ages 5 to 18 years the supports they need—both in and out of the classroom.

Scoring is quick and straightforward, and existing BRIEF2 scores (or PARiConnect results) can be used–there’s no need to retest. Scores are first plotted alongside skylines of scores from children and adolescents known to have ADHD to help evaluators get an at-a-glance view of how their clients’ and students’ ratings compare.  Next, using classification statistics and an evidence-based approach, scores from the BRIEF2 Working Memory and Inhibit scales are used to predict the likelihood of ADHD and determine likely subtype. Finally, specific responses on individual BRIEF2 items are compared to DSM-5™ ADHD criteria.

Results from the BRIEF2 ADHD Form can help professionals develop Individual Education Plans and provide academic interventions and accommodations and help get students on the path to success.

Coming to PARiConnect this summer!

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Recently, PAR Project Director Carrie Champ Morera, PsyD, NCSP, LP, interviewed Kirby Wycoff, PsyD, EdM, MPH, NCSP, the coauthor of Essentials of Trauma-Informed Assessment and Intervention in School and Community Settings to learn more about what inspired her to write this book, who would benefit from reading it, why it’s important to assess trauma in schools and community settings, and what she learned while writing it.

Check out the article under the Resources tab on the product page to learn from childhood trauma expert Dr. Wycoff!

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As remote testing becomes a necessity, PAR is working to assist our Customers. We are offering free e-Manuals to Customers who have previously purchased the printed version of manuals published by PAR.

If you currently don’t have access to a PAR-published print manual due to social distancing, we will provide you with free access to an e-Manual version of that same assessment for free. It’s our way of helping our Customers adapt and adjust to providing care remotely.

We’ve also developed a short video on how to use our e-Manuals. The video walks you through downloading and installing an e-Manual, then covers specifics on the convenient features our e-Manuals offer, such as search functions, bookmarks, etc.

To request your free e-Manual, contact Customer Support at 1.800.331.8378 or via e-mail at cs@parinc.com. Please reference your account/previous order information for the manual in question.

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Dr. Carrie Champ Morera, project director, and Daniel McFadden, director of Customer Support, were thrilled to join Dr. Jeremy Sharp from The Testing Psychologist podcast to discuss telehealth.

They chatted about topics to consider regarding remote assessment, addressed concerns such as technology issues and cultural factors in remote administration, talked about PARiConnect, and provided information on how PAR continues to support clinicians during the COVID-19 crisis.

Listen today!

This week’s blog was written by Teri Lyon. Teri is a senior technical support specialist at PAR. She has been with PAR for more than 20 years. Today she imparts a little advice on how stepping away has helped her create balance during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Lately, it seems like we’re stuck in a stanza from Billy Joel’s hit “We Didn’t Start the Fire.”

              Toilet paper, “Tiger King,”

              PRACTICE SOCIAL DISTANCING!

              Wearing masks, stay on task,

              DO NOT LEAVE HOME!

It’s pretty shocking to think that what we’re going through right now will be in history books for students to read about in awe and, hopefully, not in recognition. Being in Florida, we’re used to having to hunker down for hurricanes and dealing with power outages from what seems like a tiny summer storm. This, of course, is on a totally different level—the kind of level that can be overwhelming. Well, I have some advice:

STEP AWAY FROM THE COMPUTER. STEP AWAY FROM THE TV.

Seems simple, right? Not so fast. If you’re like me, you want to know what is going on in the world and even your neighborhood. You want facts, data, information! Lately, though, it’s been a bit too much. Commercials are even referencing COVID-19, so you don’t even get a break when the show you are watching takes one. Is the information we’re getting even correct? Does anyone really know what they’re talking about? Separating fact from fiction is more frustrating than ever, it seems. So, just step away (but not like out of your yard, though, unless you are wearing a mask). I’m really just saying take a break from it all in any way that you can. Turn off the electronics. Pick up a pen, take a walk, take some pictures, take a break from it all.

I’ve had to embrace my inner introvert since this started. Around the three-week mark, I had to step away. For a full day, I didn’t so much as look at my phone. This was so helpful and really made me feel a lot better about myself, my family, and what we are doing to stay safe. After that day, I made an effort to balance my time. Think of a work–life balance situation but make it more of a COVID–no-COVID balance. Also, let your support group be your support group. Reach out and commiserate. Then, just step away for a bit.